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Welcome to the website of the British Llama Society

Llamas are members of the South American camelid family and are mostly found in the high altiplano regions of the Andes in Peru, Bolivia and Chile. They are the domesticated cousin of the wild guanaco and are extensively used by the Andean people and in the past by the Incas, as beasts of burden, for food, for fibre and their hides used as leather. The British Llama Society has been set up to promote all aspects of llama and Guanaco ownership - good husbandry, breeding, trekking, driving, showing and much more. It publishes a quarterly magazine, Llama Llink.

Very importantly it operates a registration system for llamas, guanacos, vicunas and camels; an important facility in these days of increasing regulation. It is also affiliated to British Camelids Ltd, a charity which promotes the responsible ownership of all camelids in the UK.

The Society brings together a lively community of people all of whom have been captivated by these fascinating animals. We operate a forum for all things llama related and within the forum is a special members-only area for members of the BLS. Below you can find out all about our recent news and events!

We encourage you to register to take part in the forums, although it is possible to chat about llamas in both the guest and members areas Yes there are probably links to the llama song, llama pictures, llama uk, llamas in hats, and llama duck in here too, but that is the magic of a forum! BLS members need to fill in their BLS number when applying to grant access to the members only section of the forum, where files and other discussions are available.Guanaco, Alpaca and Camels are all camelids, but we specialise in llamas here. the british alpaca society have their own forum. vicuna and guanacos are looked after by them. You can also visit the official home of The British Llama SocietyAlpaca or llama? llama definitely. not alpaca. llamas do need a headcollar




































































































































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In conjunction with British Camelids Ltd, the British Alpaca Society has established a ring-fenced fund for research into bTB in camelids. This is in addition to the funding already given to Defra/VLA to carry out research to try to validate a number of bTB tests.Anyone who wishes to make a donation to this vital work may do so through www.justgiving.com/camelids Alternatively, please
On Monday 8th November Defra made public a number of research reports relating to the injectable badger vaccine, BadgerBCG. A scientific paper based on the results from the vaccine efficacy research has now been accepted for publication in Proceedings B of the Royal Society.This paper will be published online on December 1st, and will be available on the following webpage: http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/lookup/doi/10.1098/rspb.2010.1953.Defra

The following is a web site which you may like to monitor for information. However, BLS does not warrant any of the information - it is offered as a matter of interest : http://www.vetsonline.com/actualites/detail/32287/wales-urges-further-response-to-camelid-consultation.html
A copy of the joint responses submitted by BLS, BAS and British Camelids to the Welsh Assembly Consultation document, English Consultation Document and Defra Consultation document in relation to TB in non bovines and the eradication of TB and control of Badgers is available for members to read in full within the Forum.





The Society will be holding its annual show as part of the Royal County of Berkshire Show at the Newbury Showground on the 18th and 19th September. The show is one of the biggest agricultural shows with a huge range of attractions for all the family - Members refer to Forum under "Notices & General Information" for application details and further information.
Sunday 26th September 2010.
 
A chance for members to meet and enjoy trekking their Llamas in wonderful north Nottinghamshire countryside.
Meet at 2pm at; Vale View, Manor House Court , Kirkby in Ashfield, Notts. NG17 8LH.  This is 4 miles from Junction 28 of the M1.
 
We will trek for about 2 hours (3.25 miles), before returning to the house for Tea, Sandwiches, Cake and the all important Llama chat!  A collection will be made for Macmillan Cancer Support.
 
The starting location is not easy to find, and parking will need to be organised beforehand.  Therefore anyone intending to come should advise me, so I can send directions and make arrangements when I have an idea of numbers. Also could you advise if you have straw/shavings in your trailer as we are in a residential area and want to avoid making a mess.  Parking will be allocated in a suitable area for those that have.
 
If anyone would like to come without animals, and borrow a llama please let me know, as I might be able to arrange this.
 
Stout shoes and nettle-proof trousers are recommended, as we will be going through a wooded area.
 
We look forward to seeing as many of you as possible on the day.
 
Brian Haughton
East Midlands Co-ordinator
Tel: 0775 220 6481
haughton_brian@hotmail.com


A series of meetings presented by BVCS Vet, Gina Bromage, MA, VetMB, DVM, MRCVS.

TB is a serious, notifiable disease which can be passed to humans. It can be caught from wildlife, from other infected livestock and from infected alpacas and llamas. The disease kills alpacas, llamas and other camelids, in some cases very quickly.
 
The British Alpaca Society has arranged a series of TB Awareness... Meetings at 14 venues around the country at which respected camelid vet, Dr Gina Bromage, MA, Vet MB, DVM, MRVCS, will give the veterinary perspective on the facts about the disease, the symptoms to look out for, the precautions you can take to reduce the risk of your herd becoming infected, the actions that you have to take if you find TB in your herd, and the tests available. She will also answer questions on the subject.
 


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These meetings are FREE OF CHARGE to ALL CAMELID OWNERS.
 
Details of the meetings are given below. Details are also available on the BLS website (
www.BritishLlamaSociety.org). Please tell any camelid owners that you know who may not be BLS members about the meetings and encourage them to attend. It will be a great help if you can let us know to which venue you will be coming. The meetings are supported by Animal Health and the Veterinary Laboratories Agency and representatives of these organisations will be in attendance wherever possible. These meetings give you a chance to get the facts about TB. You owe it to your herd, and all other herds with which your animals come in contact, to attend and we look forward to meeting you there. Please e-mail secretary@bas-uk.com or llamaliz@hotmail.com to let us know which meeting you plan to attend.
 
James Barnett from the Veterinary Livestock Agency will be speaking after the AGM on 13 March 2010 on the subject 'The VLA, Disease Surveillance and Camelids'. This meeting is supported by British Camelids Ltd and is open to non-members.
 
Thank you for your participation – let's beat TB together! Liz Butler – Health & Welfare Officer BLS
Mike Birch – Chairman, British Alpaca Society
TB Meetings venues & dates



SATURDAY AND SUNDAY 1st and 2nd MAY
University of the Great Outdoors, Herefordshire. Llama trekking taster sessions as part of tourist event, also including sk trekking, bungee running, canoeing, belly dancing, paintballing, golf, archery, tai chi and wall climbing. More information on www.visitherefordshire.co.uk or contact Robert Dewar info@oldkingstreetfarm.co.uk


BLS Llama Link magazine featured on the programme Have I Got News for You, aired 18 October - watch the 5 min clip below of the comedy show and see a couple of our headline articles causing much frivolity with Martin Clunes and the cast.




Russell Ives


 
This year we had everything!  Good weather, a good turnout and a smashing tea (produced by my partner Neil). 
 
Twelve people and llamas turned out for a trek through this hidden bit of rural countryside within a built up area near the M1.  We set off at 14.30 and arrived back at 16.30, having caused a stir with a few walkers along the way. 
 
The route included a fairly steep decent down the bank of a disused railway bank, which had a couple of people off their feet, and one loose llama but no harm done.
 
We then gathered again on the lawn to entertain our neighbours, who were invited to join the llama folk for a Macmillan Cancer Fund tea.  A collection was made which raised £104.00 - many thanks for the generous contributions.
 
Many thanks to those who attended for their support.  This makes the organising so worthwhile.
 
Brian Haughton
East Midlands Co-ordinator


 
 



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Russell Ives
 Time to record your cria

'The BLS board is working hard to look after the interests of all members and their llamas. To do this it is vital that the llama register is accurate.  In other species identification measures are enforced.  For example all cattle must be registered with the national cattle movement services before they are two weeks old, must carry a passport, must have pre movement bTB test and must report all movements on or off the farm to the central registry; all equines must carry a passport and be microchipped; there are movement restrictions on pigs; and even sheep will have to be compulsorily microchipped from next year.
The BLS argue that we hold the national registry, can contact all owners and breeders quickly in the event of an emergency and that outside intervention is not necessary.  If members are failing to register all births and sales, especially to non members, that argument begins to break down.  If we cannot hold that argument, we cannot hope to represent the industry and protect our members from restrictive legislation.
Please register your cria NOW.
To record your 2009 and cria (and your older animals if they have still not been added to the registry)  is very straight forward.
 
All cria must be microchipped. It is recommended to microchip cria’s at six months old plus. To register your cria prior to the age of six months, just allocate a microchip to that animal and record it on your registration form. Don’t forget to get the cria microchipped once it is six months old. Chips from BLS cost £4.15 each which is an extremely good price. To obtain your microchips please send a padded self addressed stamped envelope, with a cheque made out to British Llama Society to Liz Butler, Nutfield Park Farm, South Nutfield, REDHILL, Surrey, RH1 5PA. Chips will be sent out within 48 hours.
Russell Ives

What were you doing on Sunday 2nd August ? Do you remeber the weather ? Did you have the company of thousands of people who were interested in llamas and alpacas ? Did you enjoy the company of top alpaca breeders ? Well Don and I did.
The Weather couldn't have been better with sunshine and a light breeze, the venue was the Cranleigh Show in West Sussex.  For the second year running we only had one entry for the show classes - Nutfield Park Farm - so for the second year running we, Nutfield Park Farm, put on a llama exhibition for the public with some of our llamas. Nick and Terry Harrington-Smith from the Alpacas Stud was supposed to be the judge but instead he brought along six of his huacaya alpaca boys and Mel and her partner Simon, from Moonsbrook Alpacas, brought along some suri alpacas.  We have never known it so busy. The show ground was heaving all day and by mid afternoon the organisers had run out of programmes. We were all talking our socks off about our beautiful animals to such a degree, we forgot to have lunch which was laid on by the organisers for us. What an experience. The public were really interested in our animals and all the animals behaved impecably.

 
Liz Butler



RUssell Ives



Given the recent emergence of several infectious diseases in the UK and the unknown effects of these diseases on South American Camelids, it seems prudent that camelid breeders take stock of their approach to biosecurity in order to protect these animals from disease This may mean changing some existing practices but the benefits of avoiding contact with disease should far outweigh any inconveniences faced. Members lo the British Veterinary Camelid Society have put these recommendations together,

The aim of "biosecurity` is to prevent the introduction and spread of disease in susceptible populations or herds lo animals. Mainly we are talking about viruses, bacteria and parasites Below is a list of potential diseases and organisms that may be spread from animal to animal:

Gastrointestinal parasites (including worms coccidia and fluke)
Skin parasites, especially Chorioptes mites
Bacterial pathogens (e.g. Strap zooepidemicus Salmonella)
Mycobacteria (including M bovis (TB) and M avium subsp paratuberculosis (Johne’s Disease)
Viruses (e.g. llama adenovirus, respiratory viruses. equine herpesvirus-1)
Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus?
FMD?
Blue-tongue?


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For the latter 3 viral diseases, the pathogenesis of potential disease in camelids and the effects of these viruses in terms of causing clinical disease in our species is largely unknown Further research is needed, but in the meantime, it would be prudent to include them in biosecurity considerations to try and minimize their effects. Essentially, biosecurity means protecting your existing herds from exposure to disease that may be brought in by new animals. and minimizing the risk oft spread of disease amongst newly introduced animals while also minimizing exposure to potential pathogens (disease-causing agents) that already exist on the farm. It is important to understand that animals may be clinically normal and showing no signs of disease while actually either incubating disease or being sub-clinically affected ‚ for example shedding coccidia although not having diarrhea. Therefore, it is not adequate merely to exclude animals that appear to be unhealthy as those that appear healthy (and may have passed veterinary health examinations) may still introduce disease onto your farm. A veterinary health certificate only shows that the animal appeared to be healthy at the time of the examination and does not certify the animal as free from disease It is also important to realize that the stress of moving animals from one farm to another, attending shows, changes in environmental conditions and social status can cause immune system suppression such that an animal that was previously healthy may be more susceptible to development of disease or may start to excrete the virus, bacterium or parasite, For example, it is quite common for an animal to have a negative fecal evaluation for parasites prior to transportation, and then several weeks later to find that the same animal has a clinically significant parasite burden, Commingling of animals at shows or while visiting breeding farms increases the potential exposure of animals to disease while also causing a certain degree of stress-induced immunosuppression For comparison, imagine a night spent on an aircraft traveling back from holiday - the effects of sleep deprivation (a stressor) suppress your immune system such that your body is less able to prevent the development of a cold from exposure to a cold virus breathed out by someone on the plane nearby.
Russell Ives

We suggest following these practices:

1. Avoid introducing any animals that do not appear healthy to the rest of the herd.

2. Know the disease status lo any herd from which you are buying animals, or where your animals are being temporarily housed. Ask about current health status on the farm, but also previous problems with diseases such as gastrointestinal problems (diarrhea, parasites…) respiratory disease, abortion, ill-thrift or failure of passive transfer. Knowing that a particular farm had a problem with diarrhea for example is not necessarily a problem; knowing that the problem was identified, diagnosed and correct treatment and prevention measures employed should be reassuring and also shows that the farm knows what they are doing!

3. Insist on the pre-movement testing (PMT) and treatment of animals prior to their arrival. This is to show that they are at least as healthy as your own animals and requires that you have that same knowledge of the health status of animals on your own farm. There is little point in demanding testing of incoming animals unless you know that your own animals are healthy! Testing might at a minimum involve PMT for bovine TB by the comparative intradermal skin test or blood test as agreed, for BVD antigen (not antibody), and the treatment for endoparasites if required. No farm without an obvious chorioptic mange problem should accept a new animal with active lesions.

4. Isolate and quarantine all new animals before introducing them to the herd This includes animals that have been to shows or off-farm for breeding purposes since they have been commingling with other animals. lf you are introducing solitary animals, you may wish to place herd animals in the quarantine area to reduce the separation stress - choose less valuable animals for this such as geldings, avoid using breeding or lactating females.

a) Recommended quarantine period 30 days. This is the gold standard DEFRA and WAG may well in future introduce post-movement standstill orders of 5-7 days

b) Operate an all-in, all-out policy such that all animals housed in the quarantine area leave quarantine at the same time The quarantine period only starts from the time the last animal entered. Do not have animals moving in and out of the quarantine area on an individual basis.

c) The location of the quarantine site should be physically separate from the main herd as well as its handling facilities and housing. Ideally this should be several hundred yards away if possible and positioned such that it is downwind from the main herd but at the very least. there should be a double fence-line between the groups in order to prevent direct contact.
d) On a larger facility, have different staff working with the quarantine group and do not have the same staff return to the main herd. If this is not possible, tend to the main herd before tending to the quarantine group.

e) Wear clothing and footwear that is dedicated to the quarantine group when tending to this group - must be washable (e.g. wellies okay suede or fabric workbooks are not) Color coding of overalls is an obvious and visible reminder.

f) Monitor the animals in quarantine on a daily basis. Monitor attitude, appetite, water consumption, urination and defecation as well as for any signs of coughing, discharge from the eyes or nose, diarrhea etc. Animals showing any signs of disease should be further separated from the rest of the animals in quarantine and evaluated by a vet.

g) Evaluate a fecal sample on entry to the facility and 3 weeks later Ideally fecal samples should be collected every 3 days and stored in the fridge (Cebra 2007) If there is a subsequent problem with parasite-related illness or excretion then the source of the infestation can be determined. Treatment should be done if animals are found to have significant parasite burdens and their faeces retested 14-21 days later.

5. Minimize exposure of herd to human visitors. lf visitors come to the farm, question them about exposure to other livestock and where they have come from and make sure that they come to the farm wearing clean clothes and boots. Provide visitors with overalls and either Wellington boots or overboots kept on the farm for this purpose. Make sure that hand-washing facilities are available and that they are used.

6. Maintain optimum condition of animals in the herd. This will make them less susceptible to disease.

  • under conditioning can cause problems
  • are provided. Mineral deficiencies can be responsible for disease problems in herds. Also, ensure that young growing stock receive sufficient vitamin D to prevent rickets
  • shelter from rain, wind, cold and snow in the winter. Appropriate bedding (e.g. straw) may also be necessary for protection from cold.
7. General cleaning and disinfection.
Russell Ives

a) Personal hygiene to prevent transmission of pathogens between animals and from animals to humans (known as "zoonotic disease”).

Frequent hand washing with hot water and soap
Cleaning and disinfection of boots
Thorough washing of clothing used when caring for animals

b) Disinfection requires surfaces to be clean. All organic matter (faces, urine, milk, spit) must first be removed before disinfection can work on fences, floors, walls, clothing or hands. Disinfection may be difficult for certain organisms such as Cryptosporidia (which can also cause disease in humans) so is best avoided in the first place by following optimal biosecurity on the farm.

Reference:
Barrington GM et al. Biosecurity and biocontainment in alpaca operations. Small Rum Res 61 (2006).217-225 Cebra C. Update on parasitology. International Camel Conference, Oregon 2007

Claire E. Whitehead BVM&S MS DACVIM MRCVS


Julie Tripp and her husband got up exceedingly early to drive from Cornwall to join us for the 150th Show. Well worth the effort thought as they won Reserve Championship with Maisy – the Dewers took the Championship with Croft Amberley.

Also joining in the fun of the day were Phil and Fiona Davis, Fanny and David and Caroline Pembro.

This year there were 6 competitors with 21 Llamas judged by Mrs Alvis helped by ring steward Sheila. Thanks are extended to them both for their hard work. You can tell they love Llamas and they’re good with people too!

29 Alpacas came to the show and were judged by Mrs Field. They will probably be given their own ring next year.

For the first time, we had Guanacos at the show. Norma Chandler Paterson bought her Guanaco who was born on her farm about 10 years ago and had never left the place. However, he loaded easily and was quite unfazed by all the people, noise and hustle and bustle. So please lets have more Guanacos for next year. Fiona and Phil bought their Guanaco also.

The obstacle race is always good fund and much enjoyed by the public. The North Somerset Show committee provide excellent penning and water supply.

Though the day was cold with a little rain, all participants enjoyed each other’s company and the whole day. Come and see for yourselves next year – more enthusiasts can only improve the event .

(With thanks to Norma Chandler Paterson)


An invite was received by the British Llama Society from the Show organisers, asking for a Llama exhibit to join their annual show which was to have an “Around the World” theme.

Somehow, this invite landed with the Ives Family and so we set off early on Saturday morning with five of our Llamas to join the fun of the day.

Kings Bromley Show has been held annually since 1919. It is a lovely village show but quite substantial. We were made very welcome and proved to be a huge fascination to the show visitors. It was a lovely sunny warm day – not even a rain shower and so visitors came in their thousands rather than hundreds. The local press and the Burton on Trent press came to our stand taking photographs for the local newspapers.
Russell Ives



We had two people ask us to attend their shows being held in and around the area in early September, but unfortunately we were unable to commit due to holiday arrangements.

It was a day of tremendous PR for the Society and we were very grateful to Brian Haughton the BLS area representative who joined us to help for the day.

Vivienne Ives

5th July

Having never been available on previous years, to join the annual walk in the Park arranged by Ordell Safran , it was with excitement that John and I followed Nav(womans) instructions on how to find the meeting point. It was lucky Henry Safran had parked himself at the appropriate junction, or we could still have been circulating the park hours later.

We were not able to take along any of our Llamas due to other commitments, but Ordell kindly loaned us a Llama each. Two wonderful well mannered yearlings. It was a relief to be advised they were already sold, otherwise, I would not have had the willpower to let them go home with Ordell.



There was a good turnout of members, their friends and Llamas and as we walked through the Park, the sun shone on us. After walking for about an hour, at the top of the Long Walk, both Llamas and us walkers were ready for a picnic break. The Llamas were tethered to trees in the shade and the rest of us settled down to the picnics which Henry and Ordell had transported for us to the chosen spot. And what a wonderful view we had of Windsor Castle and beyond from the hilltop in the Park. The park is truly magnificent and it was an opportunity to enjoy the views and sights of the park whilst in a good company of people with a mutual love for Llamas.

Thank you so much Ordell for making the arrangements and to the members who joined us making it such a successful and enjoyable event.

Vivienne Ives

 
What were you doing on Sunday 2nd August ? Do you remeber the weather ? Did you have the company of thousands of people who were interested in llamas and alpacas ? Did you enjoy the company of top alpaca breeders ? Well Don and I did.
The Weather couldn't have been better with sunshine and a light breeze, the venue was the Cranleigh Show in West Sussex.  For the second year running we only had one entry for the show classes - Nutfield Park Farm - so for the second year running we, Nutfield Park Farm, put on a llama exhibition for the public with some of our llamas. Nick and Terry Harrington-Smith from the Alpacas Stud was supposed to be the judge but instead he brought along six of his huacaya alpaca boys and Mel and her partner Simon, from Moonsbrook Alpacas, brought along some suri alpacas.  We have never known it so busy. The show ground was heaving all day and by mid afternoon the organisers had run out of programmes. We were all talking our socks off about our beautiful animals to such a degree, we forgot to have lunch which was laid on by the organisers for us. What an experience. The public were really interested in our animals and all the animals behaved impecably.

 
Liz Butler




WALK IN WINDSOR GREAT PARK – 5 JULY 2009


Having never been available on previous years, to join the annual walk in the Park arranged by Ordell Safran , it was with excitement that John and I followed Nav(womans) instructions on how to find the meeting point. It was lucky Henry Safran had parked himself at the appropriate junction, or we could still have been circulating the park hours later.

We were not able to take along any of our Llamas due to other commitments, but Ordell kindly loaned us a Llama each. Two wonderful well mannered yearlings. It was a relief to be advised they were already sold, otherwise, I would not have had the willpower to let them go home with Ordell.

There was a good turnout of members, their friends and Llamas and as we walked through the Park, the sun shone on us. After walking for about an hour, at the top of the Long Walk, both Llamas and us walkers were ready for a picnic break. The Llamas were tethered to trees in the shade and the rest of us settled down to the picnics which Henry and Ordell had transported for us to the chosen spot. And what a wonderful view we had of Windsor Castle and beyond from the hilltop in the Park. The park is truly magnificent and it was an opportunity to enjoy the views and sights of the park whilst in a good company of people with a mutual love for Llamas.

Thank you so much Ordell for making the arrangements and to the members who joined us making it such a successful and enjoyable event.

Vivienne Ives


Russell Ives


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Salon Européen Alpagas et Lamas_
Haras de Pompadour, Arnac Pompadour, 19230, Corrèze
17 – 18 octobre 2009

Organisateur officiel du concours: Association Alpagas et Lamas de France.
Avec la participation des Haras Nationaux de Pompadour
et de l’Association Française des Petits Camélidés

Date limite d’inscription: 11 septembre 2009
Veuillez bien respecter cette date pour la bonne organisation de notre manifestation.

 

Identification : Chaque animal participant au concours doit être identifié (transpondeur ou boucle auriculaire). L'identification sera précisée sur le certificat vétérinaire.

Registre :
Veillez à ne présenter que des animaux enregistrés à l’un des registres Nationaux ou Européens reconnus. Les participants doivent joindre obligatoirement à leur bulletin d’inscription une copie de la fiche du Registre.

Inscriptions : Les propriétaires ou éleveurs s’inscrivent sous leur nom. Ils ne peuvent inscrire que des animaux leur appartenant (confirmé par la fiche du Registre) ; les animaux qui ont été élevés, vendus ou cédés par les juges dans les 9 mois précédant le salon, ne peuvent pas être inscrits.

Russell Ives


Certificat vétérinaire: Il sera exigé pour chaque animal participant au concours. Il précisera que le cheptel d’origine est indemne de maladie contagieuse et que chaque animal qui participe au concours ne présente aucun parasite externe ni maladies infectieuses au parasitaires. Le certificat datera de moins de 10 jours. Les numéros d’identification des animaux seront notés sur le certificat. Les participants des zones non contaminées à cette date devront effectuer un contrôle avant leur départ. Si vous venez d’une zone indemne de FCO sérotype 1 (« ZV 1-8 ») amenez votre certificat de vaccination, indispensable pour pouvoir pour rentrer chez vous.

Attention : pensez à amener 2 copies de vos certificats et fiches d'enregistrement: l'un d'eux sera conservé pour la DSV, l'autre peut vous être utile lors du retour; amenez également votre attestation d'assurance Responsabilité Civile. Ces documents vous seront demandés à votre arrivée à Pompadour.
Règlement pour le ring : Pour le concours « Modèles et Allures » les juges doivent pouvoir toucher et palper les animaux (si nécessaire aussi leurs testicules) vérifier la queue et leur dentition. Veuillez habituer vos animaux à être manipulés.
Dans les concours de sport, une seule et même personne ne peut présenter que 3 animaux dans la même épreuve. Les animaux qui participent aux épreuves de randonnée doivent obligatoirement être entraînés et accepter un bât auparavant.
Veillez à ce qu’aucune marque ou logo, personnel ou d’entreprise, ne soit visible dans le ring. Chemises claires et pantalons ou jupes sombres sont impératives pour les personnes qui présentent les animaux sur les rings. Pour les épreuves sportives vêtements et chaussures adaptés sont nécessaires (sécurité). Des aides de dressage (nourriture, friandises, « clicks » etc.), ne sont pas admises dans le ring ou les parcours. Les animaux qui par leur comportement dérangent ou mettent en danger autrui peuvent être exclus. Les parents sont responsables de leurs enfants.

Russell Ives


Déroulement du concours : Veuillez observer attentivement les listes placardées et écouter les annonces au micro. La consultation de ces listes permettra de se présenter dans un ring d’attente pendant que le groupe précédent sera dans le ring de jugement. Les participants ne seront pas appelés individuellement.

Juges :
Alpagas : Mme Val Fullerlove
British Alpaca Society Judge 
Lamas : Mr Terry
Duespohl
International Llama Registry Judge

Informations sur les critères de jugement des différentes classes :
 Lama : 100 % conformation

Alpaga non tondu : 50 % conformation, 50 % laine. Huacaya longueur minimum des fibres 5 cm, pas de maximum jusqu’à 12 mois, à partir de 13 mois maximum 17.5 cm.

Suri : Longueur minimum des fibres 7.5 cm, jusqu’à 24 mois pas de maximum, de 25 mois maximum 35 cm.

Toisons seules :
couverture. Longueur minimum des fibres 7.5 cm, toutes les autres mesures : voir alpaga non tondu. Veillez à ce que les toisons inscrites arrivent le vendredi.
Lama : Couverture dorsale longueur des fibres minimum sous poils 7.5 cm, maximum 20 cm poil de garde inclus. Ne pas laver les toisons.

Descendance des Etalons : Pour cette classe doivent être engagés l’étalon et deux de ses descendants (d’au moins deux femelles distinctes.) Le père doit être inscrit en règle au concours (15 euros) sans être lui-même nécessairement présent. Les descendants doivent, en plus, effectivement participer, chacun dans leur classe, au concours Modèles et Allures. Pour le cas où plus de descendants que nécessaire seraient présentés en concours Modèles et Allures, il est possible après leur classement de décider alors quels animaux seront présentés dans le concours des descendants.

Descendance des femelles : deux animaux de deux mâles différents. Les descendants doivent participer au concours Modèle/Allure. La mère doit être inscrite en règle au concours (15 euros) sans être elle-même nécessairement présente.

Logement des animaux : Vos animaux seront logés dans des box. Remplissez la fiche box pour que nous sachions quels animaux peuvent être installés ensemble.
Chaque éleveur pourra personnaliser son box.
Le foin : une botte gratuite par box ; bottes supplémentaires disponibles au prix de 3.5€/botte.
L’eau : Pensez à amener des seaux.

Programme :
Samedi et dimanche début des épreuves à 8 heures du matin.
Inscriptions tardives Après la date normale de clôture des inscriptions, les inscriptions tardives pourront être éventuellement acceptées, à la discrétion du comité d’organisation ; dans tous les cas elles seront portées à 25€ par animal.
Après la clôture des inscriptions, les frais engagés ne seront ni remboursés ni pris en compte en cas de radiation ou annulation
ou changement d’animaux.

Possibilités de Restauration
Repas du Vendredi soir 16 octobre : 12€, jusqu’à 22 heures, au restaurant «  Le Bar des Remparts » sur inscription.
Repas du midi : sur place au choix (resto –snack)
Repas du Samedi soir: repas spectacle  « Cabaret Equestre » dans l’enceinte du château. (22€/adulte et 13€/enfant moins de 12 ans). Sur inscription.

Arrivée : Vendredi 16 octobre de 16 h à 22 heures, prévenir si vous arrivez plus tard au numéro 06.12.35.13.74.
Samedi : arrivée au plus tard à 7 heures 30.

Clôture des Inscriptions Les feuilles d'inscription sont à retourner avant le 11 septembre 2009 par toute personne participant à ces journées avec ou sans animaux.

Hébergements à Pompadour

Hôtels, voir la liste indicative séparée

Chambres d’hôtes :
contacter Office de Tourisme

Office de Tourisme du pays de Pompadour
E-mail
tourisme@pompadour.net
Tel : 05 55 98 55 47




Document à conserver

Fiche d'inscription
Salon Européen Alpagas et Lamas
Haras de Pompadour 17 – 18 octobre 2009

(une seule inscription/ once per owner / Einmalig pro Tierhalter)
(gratuit à partir du 5ième)
Per animal /pro tier
(gratuit à partir de la 4ième)
Per fleece / pro vlies
(3mx3m)
( maximum 3 Lamas/ 5 alpagas par box)

(faire le chèque à l'ordre de A L F)


Inscription

Date limite 11 septembre 2009

A payer :
Eleveur ou propriétaire 25 €


Par animal 15 € x =

Par toison 10 € x =

Toison seule / fleece only
Pro vlies
25 € + 5 € par toison


Emplacement pour stand de vente / sales stand / kiosk

90 € ou 50 € membre d’ALF/AFPC

Box / stable / stall 25€ X =







TOTAL =





Inscription pour le repas du Vendredi soir au restaurant « Le Bar des Remparts »
Nombre de repas : adultes : x 12€ =

Inscription pour la soirée du Samedi, repas et Cabaret Spectacle
Nombre de repas : adultes : x 22€ =
enfants ( de moins de 12 ans.) : x 13€ =
Total =

Faire un chèque séparé de celui des frais d'inscription (il sera encaissé plus tard)

Conditions d’inscription
 : Les animaux qui participent aux journées doivent être inscrits à un registre National ou Européen. Ils doivent être visibles par le public et donc rester dans l’enceinte de la manifestation du samedi 8 heures au dimanche 17 heures. Il sera exigé un certificat vétérinaire précisant que le cheptel d’origine est indemne de maladie contagieuse et que chaque animal qui participe au concours ne présente aucun parasite externe ni maladies infectieuses au parasitaires,. Des justificatifs d’attestations de vaccination vis-à-vis de la FCO établis par le vétérinaire ayant réalisé l’acte vaccinal dans le cas ou les animaux devront être vaccinés, d’attestations de désinsectisation contre la fièvre catarrhale ovine. L’organisateur n’acceptera pas d’animaux présentant des maladies infectieuses ou parasitaires. 

J’accepte les recommandations de l’organisateur de la manifestation.
Nom, Prénom / Name/Vornamen___________________________________________

Adresse_______________________________________________________________________________
Tél : ____________________ Date / Signature

Règlement par chèque à l’ordre/ cheques payable to: ALF

Veuillez retourner les inscriptions accompagnées de vos chèques à / post entries & payment to :
Andrew Spillane,
Chez Marot, 24410 – Echourgnac Tel 0553 800 953
spillaneaj@aol.com

Salon Européen Alpagas et Lamas

Haras de Pompadour 17- 18 octobre 2009

Russell Ives

Bulletin d’inscription de chaque animal

Merci de remplir un bulletin par animal
(cocher les cases correspondantes)

Nom du propriétaire/ Owners name/ Name de Besitzer …………………………………………………………………………

Adresse : _____________________________________________________________________

Tél. : ______________________________________________ Fax : _________________ Email :____________________________


Nom de l’animal/Animal Name Name des Tieres :_______________________________________
Affixe/ Affix/Betriebsname :_______________________
Couleur /Colour/ Farbe :_______________
Date de naissance
/D.O.B/ Geboren am :___________________
Numéro d’identification (puce, boucle….)/ID-Nr (Chip, Ohmarke…..)__________________________
Numéro d’inscription à un registre/Registration No/ Register-Nr :__________________________
O LAMA- faiblement lainé (classique) /classic / leicht bewollt O Alpaga huacaya
O LAMA - moyennement lainé / medium fibre/ mittel bewollt O Alpaga Suri
O LAMA fortement lainé / heavy fibre/ stark bewollt

O Mâle / Male/ Hengst O Femelle/ Female / Stute O Mâle castré / Wether/ Wallach

Inscription aux concours / Classes entered/ Meldungen in folgenden Wettbewerben
O Modèles et allures / Showring/ Tierprämierung
O Evaluation de la toison / fleece (alpagas et lamas)

O Obstacles
O Randonnée jeunes animaux : Animaux de moins de 2 ans. Avec bât, mais sans charge.
O Randonnée (Age min. 2 ans
)
O Descendance d’étalon (2 jeunes animaux d’au moins 2 femelles différentes) /Macho progeny 2 young from 2 different hemda/ Nachzucht : Hengst (2 Tiere aus mindestens 2 verschiedenen Stuten)
O Descendance d’une même femelle (2 jeunes animaux de deux mâles différents) / Hemda progeny, 2 young from 2 different machos / Nachzucht Stute (2 Juntiere von 2 verschiedenen Hengsten)
O Deguisement/ fancy dress


Parcours d’obstacles et randonnée :
Nom du présentateur de l’animal / Handlers name/ Name der Tierführers bei Hindernis/Trekking : ..............................................
O Adulte / Erwachserner
     
Attention: Pour chaque animal et chaque reproducteur (pour les descendances) envoyez une photocopie de la fiche d’enregistrement à un registre / For each animal & reproductor send photocopy of registration papers/ Für jedes Tier (auch Nachzucht gruppe) Bitte Kopie des Registerblattes (beide beilegen)

Les classes seront jugées et évaluées selon les critères habituels d’AOBA & ILR / AOBA & ILR show rules apply /
Die Tiere werden in den wettbewerben von AOBA & ILR Richtern bewertert.








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Hébergements à Pompadour

Hôtel Restaurant de l’Hippodrome
26, Avenue du Midi – 19320 Pompadour
05 55 73 35 03
hotel.restaurant.de.lhippodrome@wanadoo.fr

Hôtel – Restaurant Fayriland
Place du Vieux Lavoir – 19320 Pompadour
05 55 73 30 54
hotel.fayriland@orange.fr

Auberge de la Mandrie
Route de Périgeuex – 19320 Pompadour
05 55 73 37 14
contact@la-mandrie.com www.la-mandrie.com

Hôtel d’Hôtes La Boissière
Rue de la Boissière – 19310 Ayen
05 55 25 15 69
laboissiere@wanadoo.fr www.laboissiere.com

Hôtel du Midi
1,Place du Champ de Foire – 19410 Vigeois
05 55 73 28 58
hoteldumidivigeois@orange.fr

Hôtel le Rubeau
1, av de l’Industrie – 19210 Lubersac
05 55 73 56 57
oliviersainthuile@wanadoo.fr

ou contactez l’Office de Tourisme de Pompadour
05 55 98 55 47
office.tourisme.pompadour@wanadoo.fr


Gîtes de Trèfles
15 gîtes pour 6 personnes a 80€ par gite le weekend.
500 m du centre de Pompadour
0825 801 440
contact@revea-vacances.com



KINGS BROMLEY SHOW - 25 JULY 2009


An invite was received by the British Llama Society from the Show organisers, asking for a Llama exhibit to join their annual show which was to have an “Around the World” theme.

Somehow, this invite landed with the Ives Family and so we set off early on Saturday morning with five of our Llamas to join the fun of the day.

Kings Bromley Show has been held annually since 1919. It is a lovely village show but quite substantial. We were made very welcome and proved to be a huge fascination to the show visitors. It was a lovely sunny warm day – not even a rain shower and so visitors came in their thousands rather than hundreds. The local press and the Burton on Trent press came to our stand taking photographs for the local newspapers.
We had two people ask us to attend their shows being held in and around the area in early September, but unfortunately we were unable to commit due to holiday arrangements.

It was a day of tremendous PR for the Society and we were very grateful to Brian Haughton the BLS area representative who joined us to help for the day.

Vivienne Ives

Russell Ives

Code of Conduct for the Sale of Llamas

The purpose of this Code:

To help buyers, particularly first-time buyers, to avoid pitfalls in the purchase process.

To promote the well-being of the animals being sold

To provide sellers with a minimum standard to which they should conduct their sales.

Please note that not all llamas make good field pets, or are suitable for trekking or make satisfactory livestock guardians.

To help ensure your introduction to llamas is a good one, we recommend that prospective purchasers of llamas join BLS and buy only from members’ who are signatories to this Code.

Do not hesitate to ask the sellers if they are signatories

~ they should be able and happy to show you their in-date certificate

The British Llama Society does not accept advertising, nor will promote in any way, the sale of llamas by anyone who has not signed the code.

Signatories to this Code are issued with a dated certificate, which should be renewed every five years by application
Russell Ives

A separate addition to the code is available for the sale of guanacos


When selling or offering for sale any llama the signatory member of the British Llama Society undertakes:

1. To give appropriate advice and full information on the pros and cons of owning llamas to any purchaser

2. To offer purchasers after-sales advice, whenever needed, particularly concerning care and welfare

3. To give full and appropriate advice on choosing the right animal for the purchaser´s intended purpose

4. To declare any known faults in conformation or temperament which could hamper or obstruct the purpose for which the llama is purchased

5. To not knowingly offer cross-bred, in-bred, or infertile stock, or related pairs without declaring them as such

6. To provide purchasers with a full record of the animal´s breeding and veterinary history, including worming, vaccinations, etc. as far as they are known

7. To ensure that purchasers understand that, if they have more than one entire male, the males will need to be kept separately if within sight or smell of a female

8.

  1. That crias will not be bottle-fed/ hand-reared except in life-threatening circumstances, in which case the fact that an animal has been reared in this way will be declared to a potential purchaser
  2. To explain to all purchasers of camelids which are capable of breeding that, although bottle-fed/hand-reared youngsters are extremely tame and friendly when small, they are very likely to become extremely difficult to manage when they mature
  3. To explain that any male camelid which has been reared in this way should be castrated at between six and twelve months of age but that castration might not necessarily prevent such problems
  4. To request all purchasers of animals capable of breeding, to pass on this information (*a-c) to anyone who might buy from them in the future

9. Females sold as pregnant are declared -

  1. Confirmed pregnant: only following a blood test or ultrasound scan and there has been no reason to suspect a miscarriage
  2. Believed pregnant: only when mating has been witnessed and subsequent putting of the male to the female has been witnessed and not resulted in further mating
  3. Possibly pregnant: where no mating has been witnessed but an adult female has been running with an adult male

10. To advise purchasers
  1. that female camelids should not be intentionally mated until they have attained at least 60% of their likely adult weight or be at least eighteen months of age
  2. that it is possible for mating and conception to occur at as young an age as nine months and that this is detrimental to the well-being of the female. This must be borne in mind if young males and females are to be kept together
11. To ensure that when declaring that an animal is handleable or halter-trained, the animal can be led and the halter be easily put in place, with minimum stress to animal and/or handler

12. To ensure suitable transport is provided for the llamas


Signatories to this code are duty bound to not sell llamas...

... without ensuring that purchasers understand the long-term commitment

... as being “easy-to-keep” without making it clear that all livestock needs daily observation, care and attention, and can be subject to health and other problems

...without making every effort to ensure that the new home offers adequate grazing, shelter, fencing, and fresh water, etc.


If any purchaser or prosepctive purchaser, having joined BLS, believes that the terms of this Code have been breached, the matter should be referred to the Society Committee, who will investigate and take appropriate action.




Llamas are members of the South American camelid family. They were domesticated from the Guanaco some 5000 years ago. Their ancestors inhabited the plains of North America and migrated south to the Andes about three million years ago!

Llamas can be grouped broadly into two types: Ccara and Tampuli.

“Ccara”, the most commonly seen type in the UK, has a short to medium length coat with very short fibre on the legs and head and tends to be larger than the Tampuli.

The“Tampuli" is more heavily woolled than the Ccara, its coat extending down the legs and often distinguished by a woolly "topknot".

The llama is the largest of the South American Camelids, weighing anything up to 400lbs (180kg) and standing approximately 4 ft (1.25m) at the shoulder.

Elegant with an exotic quality, llamas are strong, intelligent and hardy. They have a gentle temperament and inquisitive nature. With their distinctive "banana" shaped ears, they are found in a variety of colours from solid white to black and with varying shades and mixes of brown and grey.

Llamas are very diverse animals and are becoming much sought after in the UK for their many attributes

Their life span is generally 12 to 18 years although some may live to be over 20.

Field Pets: Llamas are becoming increasingly popular as field pets being gentle, quiet, hardy and undemanding. They live in harmony with other field stock and make good companions for lone ponies etc. They quickly learn to wear a halter and to be led. Llamas can be taught to pull a cart.

Trekking: Llamas can be walked for pleasure and will happily carry a pack, offering the long distance walker or the picnicking family both a fun companion and a willing helper!
A number of enterprises around the UK offer llama treks of varying lengths from just a half day upwards.

Fibre: llamas have a double fleece; an outer guard hair and a fine, soft undercoat much sought after by hand spinners. Llamas do not have to be sheared at all, but the undercoat can be used to make an array of wonderful garments and the guard hair can be used for other products such as bags, rugs etc. The fleece comes in many natural colours from white to black with a wide range of browns and greys in between.

Livestock guardians: Although gentle by nature, male llamas are protective of their group and are used very successful to keep predators from attacking lambs and even ducks and poultry.


Guanacos

The Guanaco is not domesticated in South America but there are a small number of domestic herds in the UK. The Guanaco has an outstanding fleece, even finer than the Llama. Guanacos are a honey shade of brown or cinnamon with white under-parts and dark grey head. They stand approximately 1 to 1.5 metres at the withers, weighing 100-150 Kgs.


Chairman: Tim Crowfoot
email: chairman@BritishLlamaSociety.org


Directors: Ordell Safran, Ruth Hills, Gwyneth Hogger, Gareth Chamberlin


Magazine Editor: Brenda Birmingham
email: editor@BritishLlamaSociety.org


Registrar: Vivienne Ives
email: registrar@BritishLlamaSociety.org


Membership Secretary: Jane Brown
email: membership@BritishLlamaSociety.org


Secretary: Liz Butler
email: secretary@BritishLlamaSociety.org


Treasurer: Tim Crowfoot
email: treasurer@BritishLlamaSociety.org


Web Maintenance: Russell Ives
email: web@BritishLlamaSociety.org


Llamas are some of the easiest animals to keep as they are hardy, stoic and generally very healthy animals. All livestock should be checked at least once a day, spending a little time observing your animals and knowing their normal behavior will help you to recognize if something is amiss. General stocking rate is four llamas per acre, however this does not equate with keeping two llamas on half an acre. Pasture needs to be divided to rest one side, whilst the other is grazed. This helps to provide grazing for longer whilst helping to keep the worm burden in check.

Russell Ives


For most llamas, grazing and ad lib hay is enough to keep them healthy, with a mineral lick on hand to provide those vitamins and minerals that may be missing from their forage. Depending on the quality of your pasture and hay, supplementary feeding is not usually required; the exceptions possibly being pregnant and lactating females, weanlings and elderly llamas. By regular checking of body condition, you can gauge if your llama needs extra food, or in the case of obese animals, if you need to restrict intake. As llamas have evolved to live in harsh conditions with poor vegetation, living in the U.K. tends to make our llamas fat. Obese animals are more likely to suffer from heart and respiratory problems and in later life, arthritis. In females, it reduces fertility and lactation and is more likely to give her birthing problems.

Some books recommend worming twice a year. Many vets now advocate worming only if results of faecal testing require it. Llamas do have a good resistence to internal parasites because of their clean dunging habits (communal dunging areas) unless you are very tight on grazing most will not graze around this.

It is recommended that llamas are vaccinated against clostridial diseases. This consists of two doses usually a few weeks apart initially but as recommended by your vet, and then a yearly booster, is sufficient to keep them safe from these deadly diseases. Pregnant females need a pre-birth booster 2 – 6 weeks before calving so that she passes on her anti bodies to her new born cria. Vaccination against Bluetongue is now essential to protect your herd – even if there are only two of them! Two injections 3-4 weeks apart are required initially then an annual booster which should be given in March or April to maximize the protection during the midge season since it is midges that spread the disease. Bovine TB is another threat to camelids. There is no vaccination at present and no compulsory testing. However, you should bear in mind that there are some hot spots where this disease is endemic and you should therefore think carefully before taking animals out of these areas to areas free of it. The DEFRA website can give you information on these areas.

The majority of llamas never need to have their toe nails or teeth trimmed. Llamas that come onto hard standing areas, or are taken for walks on hard surfaces, will wear their toe nails down naturally. Llamas with a good jaw alignment will also keep their teeth in check and it is rare for these animals to need attention.

Last but not least is stress. Llamas are born with a gentle, inquisitive nature. They are not aggressive or confrontational. They will play and chase each around and enjoy being taken out for walks. Breeding males that run with females all the time can sometimes get territorial and possessive so are best kept separately. Introducing new llamas to an established group can sometimes cause ructions, but providing you allow them to get to know each other across a fence for a while, they usually accept the newcomers. Bullying can occur when greedy llamas or older llamas mix with younger llamas or newcomers. Understanding normal llama behavior will alert you to any problems in the herd, so check your llamas at least once a day and enjoy!



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Before you buy...


Join BLS (download membership form)

Ensure the seller is a BLS member and an up-to-date signatory to the BLS Sales Code of Conduct

Check that the llamas (or guanacos) you are interested in are registered with the BLS. This has a number of important benefits:

It helps ensure and ascertain that the stock you buy is not in-bred (a potential health problem).

It helps you to ensure that breeding pairs or groups can be put together that are unrelated

It helps us monitor the whereabouts of the nation's stock (vital for dealing with potential disease problems or governmental edicts).

It offers breeders the opportunity to monitor and demonstrate the progress of their breeding programmes, which in turn encourages the breeding of quality stock.

Only registered llamas can be shown at official Shows.

Ultimately we expect that only registered stock will be able to take advantage of any insurance arrangements BLS is hoping to put in place.

Talk to and visit as many members as possible - Once you have joined you are welcome to call any of our committee members or other listed contacts for a chat.

See as many llamas as you can

Attend any meetings that are being organised in your area (or beyond) AND ask questions

Ensure that you have enough land with secure fencing and shelter to keep llamas

Be prepared to have animals that may live for many years

Decide what you really want a llama for... Trekking? Showing? Fibre? Livestock Guarding? A companion for other livestock? Field Pet? Breeding?

Do not buy an entire male unless you have the right facilities to keep him.

Consider the health of the animal and any others in the herd from which you are buying. Check vaccination and worming records.

Look carefully and critically at its conformation and the way it moves. Is it sound?

What is its temperament like?

Can you see the parents?

If it is sold as halter trained, can YOU put a halter on it? Can YOU lead it? Will it load into a trailer?

If it is not trained in any way, are YOU confident that YOU can do it yourself?

Check whether the animals are registered with British Camelids, and, if they are not, obtain as much information as possible about their parentage and grandparents.

Important: Ensure that the llama you are interested in is not "too friendly"! If a youngster is pushy or overtly friendly then it will have been hand-reared or over-handled. Whilst very tempting when little, such llamas have "imprinted" and will grow up to be, at best, difficult and pushy - and at worst, a danger.


REMEMBER:

Llamas are herd animals and should NEVER be kept on their own. Two or more of the same sex or gelded, make the best field pets.

Never buy a breeding pair unless you have the facilities to separate them at the appropriate time.


To breed or not to breed that is the question. The first things to consider, are whether you have the facilities and what are you going to do with the cria after it is born. Remember that if you plan to sell it, you must be willing to put in the time and effort to make sure it is well handled and halter trained. It is all well and good if you have a suitable male and a suitable female to put together; but, you must be aware that the male and female must be separated before the female gives birth. After the birth, the female should not go back to the male for between 10 and 21 days. Whether the cria is a female or male, it will have to be separated from the stud male at about six months. If left with the stud, the stud may try to cover his daughter or fight with his son. When they are separated, you will need a companion for the weanling and a separate paddock for them.

Next, you must consider whether the male and female are suitable for breeding. Do they have proper genitalia? Do they have any major conformation faults? When deciding which males and females to breed, be objective not emotional. Very few llamas are without some faults. So, in choosing a mate for your female, select a male that will improve her poor qualities. For example, if your female is slightly knock kneed, select a male with straight legs.

Llamas are induced ovulators, a female does not ovulate until she has been stimulated by the male. This means that they can conceive any time of the year. The average llama is pregnant for 340 to 345, but, females can be pregnant from 330 days to 375 days. Since the female is an induced ovulator , you can chose the time of year that your cria is born.

There are several methods of breeding. Which you use depends on your time and your facilities. One method is pasture breeding. This is the more natural way. The male has his field and the females are introduced to him. This has the advantage of less stress and ensures that the male will keep breeding with her as long as she is open. The disadvantage is that after awhile, if the female does not get pregnant, the male may loose interest. To prevent this, the male may be removed from the field for a week and then re-introduced. The other problem is that since you cannot watch them 24 hours a day, you don’t know exactly when the female has been successfully covered.

The second method is hand breeding. This is only workable when the male and female are kept separately and are halter trained. Therefore, it involves having more fields and more time. The female is introduced to the male in a place of your choosing. After the initial breeding, the two are separated and then re-introduced four days later. Check her behavior. If she lets the male cover her, she has not ovulated and the male will mate her again. You continue to re-introduce them until she refuses the male. This method gives you a better idea of when the cria might be due.



Whichever method you use, you can test if the female has conceived either by blood testing for progesterone levels after 21 days of her refusing the male or by an ultra sound scan after 50 days.

If the male and female are kept together after mating, they must be separated before the female gives birth. It has been known for the male to try to cover the female while she is giving birth with some very bad results.

Most births happen during the day. Some llamas show signs of getting near giving birth, others do not, particularly first time mothers. Most llamas “bag-up” one to six weeks before birthing. This is when the mammary glands fill-up with milk. Also, when getting ready to give birth, the rear end of the female becomes slack and the vulva elongates.

The mother-to-be often appears restless, stands alone humming, goes to the dung pile often, and lays down and gets up frequently. Normally the crias front legs appear first and then the nose. The cria generally drops out of the mother while she is standing. This breaks the umbilical cord. Almost immediately the baby will begin rolling and trying to sit up. It is usually on its feet and suckling within a few hours. When the baby is born, you can dry it off with a towel and then you must spray the umbilical with iodine.

The last stage of the birthing process is the expulsion of the placenta (after- birth) within 4 to 6 hours. If after twelve hours it hasn’t been passed, do not try to pull it out. Seek veterinary help. The after-birth should be examined for infection, tears, hemorrhaging and completeness. You want to make sure the cria is standing, nursing and passing droppings.
Russell Ives
Russell Ives

Most important enjoy the miracle of a new llama!


Nidderdale Llamas recently sent a press release style letter to the BBC re their new trekking venture, related it to their beautiful location in the Yorkshire Dales, ideal for trekking. It must have hit the spot at the BBC since a film crew and presenter were rapidly dispatched to Nidderdale!

Suzanne Benson, who runs Nidderdale Llamas with her husband, takes up the story:

They filmed us out with real customers on a trek and interviewed some of them plus myself. The reporter was very un-inspired when she arrived, had pre-conceived ideas that llamas were bad press and didn’t have a clue what llama trekking was. Well, we changed her perspective completely! She was genuinely surprised by her bond with one of our llamas and really enjoyed her trekking. This was great as it really came across on the TV that she was at ease, relaxing with her llama and having a great experience. So many people have responded positively. I’m now receiving requests from shows, galas, festivals for the llamas to visit over the summer as they are becoming increasingly popular as an attraction. We attended a local gala yesterday with three llamas, mainly plugging the trekking side, but we were inundated with people and enquiries. It’s really changing perceptions of the public in Yorkshire, so many people initially avoid our stand, thinking of the media’s hype on spitting llamas! Then after seeing more people visit and reading the signs ‘Spit free zone’!!! they come along, stroke and talk to our animals then simply fall in love with them. I so enjoy seeing the public’s attitude change as they meet us.

I can safely and ‘proudly’ say Nidderdale Llamas is very much in the lime light in Yorkshire at present. We do what we can to promote llamas as a really fantastic unique animal, where people can enjoy their companionship and elegance, feel safe and at ease.  We’ve had loads of local radio coverage, presenters trekking, press involvement in the local papers and we’ve sponsored the odd local event to get our name out there! 

Since opening in April, we’ve had some lovely letters of thanks from people who were either dragged along by a partner or very un-sure on arrival, so again Yorkshire folk are now being inspired by our wonderful llamas.

If you look on the link  
news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/8021730.stm  you can go to the BBC website and watch the feature they ran.”
Russell Ives


Would you believe it as soon as this good PR hit the streets Suzanne’s website crashed. However after much work it has been rebuilt, so see more about Nidderdale Llamas at their new website
www.nidderdalellamas.org.






Russell Ives
Russell Ives